Environmental training

Heat Training: heat exposure may not hinder sports performance

in Environmental training

How temperature affects performance – Why Heat’s Not Such a Bad Thing According to popular wisdom, heat exposure damages exercise performance, while lowering body temperature improves it. But this theory has been cast into doubt by a new study which showed no difference in maximal exercise performance in healthy subjects exposed alternately to hot (35ºC)... MORE

Heat stroke in the cold?

in Environmental training

Cool weather heat stroke risk Most athletes, particularly those doing running exercise, only worry about heat stroke in hot conditions. But a case report of a near-fatal incident during a cool-weather marathon in the US suggests they may need to think again. A well-trained male runner in his late 30s collapsed 10m before the finish of... MORE

Exercise in the heat and pre-cooling techniques

in Environmental training

Pre-cooling techniques increase performance in the heat Research has tended to focus on how body cooling can aid the performance of endurance athletes competing in hot, humid environments. But there is growing evidence that pre-cooling can offer performance advantages in a range of temperatures, during training as well as competition, and in non-continuous sports. Exercise... MORE

Face-cooling improves sports performance

in Environmental training

The effects of face-cooling during hyperthermic exercise There’s no doubt that effective face-cooling strategies can help improve sport performance in very hot conditions. However (as Matt Lancaster has indicated elsewhere in this issue), effective cooling protocols are not always convenient or possible during match or race conditions. Face-cooling (applying cold packs to the forehead) as... MORE

Attitude training

in Environmental training

“Who is going to win? I am going to win!” Whatever your sport, there are three levels of training. First, you train to be fit enough to take part, then you train hard enough to be competitive, and after that, if you are good enough, you train to be the best – international level. Put... MORE

Altitude versus sea level

in Environmental training

Why has the progression of world records slumped since endurance athletes began training at altitude? During the years between 1956 and 1968, no endurance runner gave a thought to training in Boulder, Albuquerque, the French Alps, the mountains near Mexico City, or in any of the currently popular moderate- to high-altitude training sites. In spite... MORE

Altitude training effects

in Environmental training

Is altitude training a waste of time and money? The effects of training and, more recently, sleeping at high altitude on athletic performance have been studied in the West for more than 30 years. During that time, these practices have become an almost essential aspect of the preparation of world-class competitors. Yet the evidence base... MORE

Altitude training: can it help endurance athletes reach new...

in Environmental training

Pre-competition altitude training has long been used as strategy to enhance performance in endurance athletes. But how much does altitude training really help and can athletes reap the same benefits from simulated altitude training? Belle Roels and Grégoire Millet look at the latest evidence The popular belief that altitude training enhances endurance has probably arisen... MORE

Altitude training

in Environmental training

If altitude training doesn’t work, then why are the Kenyan runners so quick? Scientific research has been extremely unkind to a very popular form of training – altitude training. As scientists have consistently pointed out, training at altitude usually leads to decreased power outputs (slower running speeds, more lethargic cycling velocities, etc.) during workouts, leading... MORE

Acclimatisation: A competitive strategy to combat heat

in Environmental training

Clare Miller discusses strategies to stay cool when the heat is on… Sustained hard exercise in a hot environment presents a greater challenge to the body’s homoeostatic mechanisms than any other situation. The combination of a high rate of metabolic heat production and a restricted capacity for heat dissipation leads to hyperthermia (high body temperature),... MORE


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